The State of the Lottery

lottery

The lottery began in New York in 1967 and grossed $53.6 million its first year. The New York lottery attracted residents from neighboring states to purchase tickets and quickly twelve more followed suit by the end of the decade. The lottery soon became a popular activity throughout the Northeast, allowing states to raise money for public projects without increasing taxes. The popularity of lottery games allowed these new forms of gambling to attract a Catholic population that was generally tolerant of the idea.

New York has the largest cumulative sales of any lottery

The state of New York is home to the largest lottery in the country. In fact, it has the most sales per capita of any state. And while it has the highest average draw game sales, the state’s lottery sales per capita rank second. New York, Maryland and Delaware all have more than double-digit sales increases in draw games. During the winter, Mega Millions and Powerball jackpot rolls increased significantly, boosting sales by 44% and 31%, respectively.

Massachusetts has the highest percentage return to any state government from a lottery

The lottery in Massachusetts has a high prize payout ratio compared to other state lotteries. This is one of the reasons why Massachusetts residents spend more on the lottery than their counterparts. In addition, the prize money has increased over the last six years, as a percentage of total revenue. But it’s not all roses. The Massachusetts Lottery faces some challenges and decisions ahead.

Per capita lottery spending is highest for those aged forty-five to sixty-four

The age-group that spends the most on lottery tickets is forty-five to sixty-four. Men are slightly more likely to play the lottery than women. Single people spend less on tickets than married people. Those forty-five to sixty-four years of age are considered heaviest lottery consumers. African-Americans spend more than any other group on lottery tickets. People with low incomes also spend more on lottery tickets.

Per capita lottery spending is lowest in counties with smaller percentages of poor people

North Carolina’s lottery sales are disproportionately concentrated in areas with high poverty rates, according to a new report. The report, titled “Hope and Hard Luck: The State of the Lottery,” examined lottery sales for the 2009-10 fiscal year and found that 22 of the state’s poorest counties had per capita lottery sales that exceeded the state average of $211 per person. Poverty in the state is more entrenched, according to the U.S. Census, but the lottery makes up for this in a more equitable way.